Excited To Share This

 

  So how is your military training against "whatever" going? Isn't it funny that we always assume the worst? That goes for all kinds of fear, on all levels. Yet most of us do everything we can to avoid preparing ourselves for even just the thought of it.

 When it comes to emetophobia I've recently developed an interesting thought to gain control. For other readers here you see, the worst case scenario for peeps like us is always to "catch a bug". Even if only the anxiety itself often makes us feel equally sick. So I have developed an anxiety scale:

 

1. Worst threat - bugs/norovirus.

2. Big threats - bad food, feeling forced or trapped in any way.

3. Unforeseen threat - just being anxious.

 

 Can you see where I'm getting with this? Everything is in our heads. You are safe. In this case, anxiety is the threat just as much as anything else, even if it's totally harmless. So let's reverse the scale! That way maybe you can get to the threat instead of letting it get to you. Did you get that? I'm not intending anyone to start fearing anxiety, but the opposite. When we see things for what it really is, it's getting ridiculous. The worst threat may be bad but it's not THAT bad. Let this sink in.

 

 

 

 

 This is just another potential tactic to move forward and prevent ourselves from becoming victims. As many of you readers know by now, I have a theory that sufferers of panic attacks and severe phobias may be victims of post traumatic stress disorder due to a birth trauma. No other difference than what happens to war veterans, except maybe for that it's probably way more common when you take in to consideration that we all have been born.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Posttraumatic_stress_disorder

 There may be many triggers of this short but enough severe trauma, when you were squeezed really tight without being able to escape and thought you were going to die, such as sick, claustrophobia etc.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trauma_trigger

 While I definitely think we should be moving forwards by constantly challenging ourselves, I also believe it's almost just important to go backwards and once in a while, in order to truly heal what life did to us. That's why our nightly dreams keep showing us things worth our attention and reflection. Moving forwards without going backwards will absolutely get you somewhere, but it may not take you anywhere.

  I have written in previous postings about how nightly dreams in interaction with everyday life can be a powerful tool to heal. So I'm thrilled to share some new ideas with you all. My water dreams still keep recurring. Anyone else experiencing this? I'm swimming and sometimes there are periods when this happens every or next to every night.

 

 


 

 

 

  Absolutely love swimming and do it regularly in awake state too. Water has an amazing effect on my nerve system. How about you? It seems to be all naturally very clearing, calming, uplifting, strengthening, balancing and healing. So I'm thinking those dreams must be symbolizing that.


 Then things spontaneously made sense. If you are imagining water as one way of means to for example heal trauma, how would that feel? As a sufferer of panic attacks, severe anxiety or phobias, allow yourself imagining that your traumatic memory of your birth (even if you don't remember it) is bathing in nice water. Allow everything to clean, heal and sooth. This definitely has an effect on me. Worth the effortless effort of receiving smooth unconditional healing. You may end up becoming... born again.
 
 
 
 

 
 

 Maybe this method can be applied to almost anything, I don't know. At least anything that needs to heal. Such real memories we all carry around more or less. Have you experienced violence, sorrow or accidents? Bath the pain in lovely water. Are you a war veteran? Fully swim in any water. I usually dream that I swim in a long public indoors pool that is both deep and shallow. So it's both nice and safe and a bit frightening at the same time, which is interesting. Always remember to be nice to yourself while in military.

 

 

 

 

I'm leaving you all with some entertainment.

It's the Swedish contribution to The Eurovision Song Contest year 2007.

Some glam against fears and phobias!

At least my emetophobic friends will get this: